Issue 106, Fall 2019

Issue 106, Fall 2019

The Magazine of the South debuts a new look! Featuring an updated cover design, new fonts, and a higher page count to accommodate more fine art and photography, the magazine has been redesigned to create a more comfortable and enjoyable experience for readers.

Highlights from the issue include Boyce Upholt’s deeply reported feature on a Louisiana tribe facing eviction due to climate change; an exclusive excerpt from Van Jensen and Nate Powell’s graphic novel, Two Dead; and a suite of poems from Nathaniel Mackey paired with collages by Tschabalala Self.

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Editor’s Letter: A New Look, by Eliza Borné

Points South

William Browning visits an artist of yarn

You Call That Wild, by Marianne Jay Erhardt

The Best That I Have, a story by Jamie Attenberg

Maurice Carlos Ruffin is being followed

Three Ghost Variations, stories by Kevin Brockmeier


Features

PATERFAMILIAS
a story by Sarah Curry

GOODBYE TO GOOD EARTH
A Louisiana tribe’s long fight against the American tide

by Boyce Upholt

FROM DOUBLE TRIO
poems by Nathaniel Mackey

TWO DEAD
The mob and the cops face off in 1940s Little Rock

a graphic story by Van Jensen and Nate Powell

GODMOTHER TEA
a story by Selena Anderson

SACRED PLACE
Paddling to Walter Inglis Anderson’s Horn Island

by Julian Rankin


Omnivore

EVERYTHING HE WROTE WAS GOOD
The pieces of Johnny Greene 
by James K. Williamson  

BEDFELLOWS FOREVER
Male romantic friendships in art and life 
by Logan Scherer

A POINTE TOWARD BLACKNESS
Could Lucy Negro Redux beckon a new era for ballet?
by Kelundra Smith

Local Fare:
MY MOTHER’S CATFISH STEW
by John T. Edge


Art by Curran Hatleberg, Brian Galderisi, Rory Doyle, Derek Wycoff, Lacey Terrell, Ruth Miller, Adair Freeman Rutledge, Josh Smith, Johnathon Kelso, John Lucas, Angela Deane, DM Witman, William Widmer, Tschabalala Self, Nate Powell, Ebony G. Patterson, Walter Inglis Anderson, Julian Rankin, Cheryle St. Onge, Nathan Gelgud 

Cover: “Untitled (Azalea)” (2012), by Curran Hatleberg.
Hatleberg’s work is on view in the Whitney Biennial through September 22, at the Whitney Museum of American Art