A feature from the Spring 2019 issue.  Hancock’s art, which includes paintings, fabricated toys, a theatrical performance, and a graphic novel, defies categorization and pulses with an almost religious intensity. Much of his work has followed the denizens of his alternate… by Trenton Doyle Hancock and Maurice Carlos Ruffin | Mar, 2019

 A Letter from the Editor, Summer 2019. At the Oxford American, we receive many pitches for stories in the category of “pilgrimages,” or “literary road trips,” or “retracing X’s steps.” I understand the appeal: the traveler can see with her… by Eliza Borné | Jun, 2019

A Points South essay from the Summer 2019 issue As an evangelist, I have showed “Miracles” to many people by lying about what it’s actually about. Generally, I describe it as a sort of joke, a curiosity. I don’t tell… by Jacob Rosenberg | Jun, 2019

An installment in John T. Edge’s Points South column, Local Fare. Calamity and travel arrest time. They beg focus and feed insights. Tourism has taken on some of the functions that religion once served. Here in America, we have ritualized restaurant… by John T. Edge | Mar, 2019

A Points South essay from the Spring 2019 issue Like many other locals, I had never valued the glades. I had never learned to see past the scraggly trees and the rocky fields. A chance Google search one day told… by Rachel Louise Martin | Mar, 2019

A featured short story from the Spring 2019 issue. I understood that he had a crush on me, because there is no service that deserves a greater-than-one-hundred-percent gratuity, but the money seemed harmless when it came out of his wallet,… by Kevin Wilson | Mar, 2019

A Points South essay from the Spring 2019 issue I hesitated at the sight of the banner so close to my home and was suddenly wary. Weary. I saw the flag and without thinking thought it code: Patriot. MAGA. Make… by Karen Good Marable | Mar, 2019

An Omnivore essay from the Spring 2019 issue.  Due to his health, Leon Redbone can no longer be interviewed. In a way, he’s become a version of the old-time musicians he so admired, about whom little is known: You can… by Megan Pugh | Mar, 2019

August 15, 2016

Here, in Virginia, at the places between public roads and private land, are uncultivated plants left to grow as they might.  A Virginia Roadside Companion is an ode to these back road still lifes.

August 01, 2016

December and Everything After looks closely at end-of-life suffering with a lens on the artist’s aging parents. The images included here follow the steady decline of Polly Gaillard’s mother since 2014, when she was found to have a slow growing abdominal sarcoma.

July 25, 2016

Harold F. Baquet—who died last year at fifty-six—takes an intimate look at New Orleans in the late 1980s. 

July 15, 2016

A story by Jill McCorkle from our Summer 2015 issue.

In all the pictures, the women held onto the poster of his bed, the very one right there. The closet door is standing open and she goes over to push it closed. The women all pose with the window behind them, the very window she is standing in front of, the window that is not on his side of the bed but hers—her window.

June 27, 2016

When the Road Seeks documents the photographer’s search for herself in a seemingly ever-expansive United States.

June 20, 2016

With Cracker Politics, The Limit of Colonial Knowledge, photographer Michael Adno rethinks Florida’s complex colonial eras alongside the state’s present-day idiosyncrasies.

June 13, 2016

In her ongoing project Backwater, Virginia Hanusik examines how coastal communities—specifically in Southeast Louisiana—respond and adapt to land loss on what the artist calls “the frontline of climate change.”

June 08, 2016

Preservation, geography, and the passing of time are Kelly’s fascinations, and his images remind us that the mundane of our present moment will become the treasure of the backward-looking future.

June 01, 2016

The photographs in For everything in heaven and earth is yours. were made in May 2015 in the heart of the Black Belt of Alabama, where, as Henkin notes, “so much of the history of photography is still present.”

March 24, 2014

I believe that finding one’s place in the world is every individual’s most challenging question. It comes easy to some, but for many others finding that spot requires much groveling and hunting to get there. I have always fallen in with the groveling crowd.