An installment of Chris Offutt’s Omnivore column, Cooking with Chris.  Every prepper magazine carried an article on water, mainly because there are a lot of overpriced devices out there for gathering, purifying, and transporting it. This gave me a sense of… by Chris Offutt | Feb, 2019

A Points South essay from the Spring 2019 issue My family has laid claim to a variety of nationalities and regional affiliations, yet there are still questions I reflect on from time to time regarding my own claim to my… by Jennifer Ho | Mar, 2019

A feature essay from the Spring 2019 issue. Kris’s threat to leave was a loaded one. No West Virginian makes that decision lightly, and to be the cause of someone’s leaving is a terrible thing. I personally knew the weight… by Mesha Maren | Mar, 2019

On the architecture of white supremacy Let us look again, now, at this beautiful house, read it this time as a series of universally legible signs for white supremacy. You arrive on horseback and wait outside a gate—the first of… by C. Morgan Babst | Mar, 2019

An installment in John T. Edge’s Points South column, Local Fare. Calamity and travel arrest time. They beg focus and feed insights. Tourism has taken on some of the functions that religion once served. Here in America, we have ritualized restaurant… by John T. Edge | Mar, 2019

 A Letter from the Editor, Spring 2019. Though I don’t believe new parents must be homebound, another truth of my current season is that my movements are mostly limited to house and office and places in between. So more than… by Eliza Borné | Mar, 2019

A Points South essay from the Spring 2019 issue Like many other locals, I had never valued the glades. I had never learned to see past the scraggly trees and the rocky fields. A chance Google search one day told… by Rachel Louise Martin | Mar, 2019

An Omnivore essay from the Spring 2019 issue.  Due to his health, Leon Redbone can no longer be interviewed. In a way, he’s become a version of the old-time musicians he so admired, about whom little is known: You can… by Megan Pugh | Mar, 2019

September 26, 2016

How to Orient Yourself in the Wilderness began as a way for photographer Jack Deese to distance himself from a documentary practice that had grown stale.

September 20, 2016

For more than thirty years, photographer Benjamin Dimmitt has visited a fragile spring-fed estuary on Florida’s Gulf coast.

September 12, 2016

For more than two hundred years, photographer Kurney Ramsey’s family line has lived in a small farming community in eastern North Carolina on a piece of land passed down through the generations.

September 08, 2016

Hebrews 12:1 reads: “Therefore, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us throw off everything that hinders and the sin that so easily entangles.” Coleman's project A Cloud of Witness, asks how much pain has this land born witness to? What scars—and what joys—do these buildings still hold?

August 15, 2016

Here, in Virginia, at the places between public roads and private land, are uncultivated plants left to grow as they might.  A Virginia Roadside Companion is an ode to these back road still lifes.

August 08, 2016

The Going Places: Southern Routes looks at those unseen places: places between places, places passed and in transition, places left behind and those that pull us forward.

August 01, 2016

December and Everything After looks closely at end-of-life suffering with a lens on the artist’s aging parents. The images included here follow the steady decline of Polly Gaillard’s mother since 2014, when she was found to have a slow growing abdominal sarcoma.

July 25, 2016

Harold F. Baquet—who died last year at fifty-six—takes an intimate look at New Orleans in the late 1980s. 

July 18, 2016

Somewhere Else explores the cultural differences we encounter in Southern commons—democratic spaces such as rural convenience stores, gas stations, and produce stands.

July 05, 2016

Atlanta, a city that destroys to build anew, forces a continually reconsidered identity.