A poem from the Fall 2018 issue. It is such a tragedy, all this Working. The vacation I need is on your mark, Get set, go. It’s been years Since I’ve seen the light by Alex Lemon | Oct, 2018

A poem from the Fall 2018 issue. The girl born at the edge                   of a copper-colored river returns, prefers her wrists                          … by Sandy Longhorn | Sep, 2018

Notes on the songs from our 20th Southern Music Issue Sampler featuring North Carolina. The profiles, eulogies, and essays herein boast of remarkable achievements of North Carolina’s musicians across eras and genres: from unassailable legends (High Point’s John Coltrane, Tryon’s… by Oxford American | Nov, 2018

Sarah Winchester and the legacy of living with guns  It’s difficult to understate how the repeating rifle revolutionized killing, of both animals and man, as it brought the world from the single-shot muzzle-loaded rifle to a gun that could hold multiple… by Sara A. Lewis | Sep, 2018

A feature essay from the Fall 2018 issue. One morning in the summer of 1996, Damian Hart was standing naked on a pier in the Aegean Sea. The sun was bearing down on Mount Athos, one of several craggy peninsulas… by Nick Tabor | Sep, 2018

A poem from the Fall 2018 issue. None of this surprises you now, does it? I’m not sure I can know that, I responded to myself. Or I think I did. I should have.  A friend told me to embrace my disorientation here, to attend to… by Curtis Bauer | Sep, 2018

A Points South essay from the Fall 2018 issue. The dock at Mountain Lake is everything a dock should be—whitewashed clapboard, punctuated by an airy pavilion with a red roof—but if you jumped off it, all you’d hit is earth.… by Nell Boeschenstein | Sep, 2018

A Points South story from the Fall 2018 issue  In the evenings, after the day’s rain, my grandfather drove through Starke counting cars in the lots of other motels, doing the math and feeling like a winner. For guests visiting… by Scott Korb | Sep, 2018

A feature essay from the Fall 2018 issue. Prine radiates a sense of well-being, along with a sort of amused nonchalance toward potential disaster. This is a good thing, because the Coupe, as it turns out, has no passenger-side safety… by Tom Piazza | Oct, 2018

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Texas Love Letter LP

Texas Love Letter LP (0)

Introducing the Oxford American's first ever vinyl LP, a Texas Love Letter compilation to compliment our Texas Music Issue & CD. Conceived and composed by the staff of the Oxford American with help from our friend, Texas songwriting legend Ray Wylie Hubbard, the LP is available as a limited-edition gift for a donor premium of $240 (to be delivered in January 2015).

Your donation to the Oxford American Literary Project, a 501c(3) non-profit organization, is tax-deductible. All proceeds from this special project will go toward producing more of the Oxford American magazine's great writing and music you love.

This special donor gift is not for sale and is limited to 400 hand-numbered copies.

TEXAS LOVE LETTER LP

Side A

1. “House of Blue Lights" by Ella Mae Morse
2. "Dirty Work At The Crossroads" by Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown
3. “Grand Candy Young Sweet” by Fever Tree
4. “Me And My Destiny” by Doug Sahm
5. “Corazon Viajero” by Tish Hinojosa
6. “Harm's Swift Way” (Demo) by Townes Van Zandt

Side B

1. “Amarillo Highway” by Terry Allen
2. “Let Her Dance” by Bobby Fuller Four
3. “The Messenger” by Ray Wylie Hubbard
4. “Satin Sheets” by Willis Alan Ramsey
5. “Gospel” by Charlie Sexton


In eleven masterful songs, the Oxford American’s Texas Love Letter LP showcases the high-caliber songcraft of the state of Texas—some of which has never been available in any form. Most notably, we are proud to debut Townes Van Zandt’s final recording, “Harm's Swift Way.” The song has been covered by Robert Plant and a few others over the years, but the original demo version has never been officially released until now. Thanks to the generosity of Van Zandt’s family and because of Townes’s appreciation of the Oxford American magazine in the last years of his life, we are honored to debut this hauntingly beautiful masterpiece.

Other highlights: A song from Willis Alan Ramsey’s long out-of-print self-titled 1972 album, a Texas cult classic; a new stripped-down arrangement of “Gospel,” recorded live by Charlie Sexton in October 2014, exclusively for this album; and, on the back sleeve of the LP, a love letter to Texas songwriting penned by our friend Ray Wylie Hubbard.

Besides delivering a quarterly magazine of stellar writing, photography, and art with a unique Southern perspective, the Oxford American is dedicated to promoting literacy and exploring Southern culture through various other creative endeavors. We exist by way of the generous support of our readers, donors, advertisers and partners and we have more projects in store like this one, but we need your support.

Donate today to reserve your copy and receive the Oxford American’s first vinyl LP release.

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TUESDAY, NOV. 27, 2018

Help us make #GivingTuesday a success! Donate to our new Women Artists Fund to make a difference. 

Without you, there’s no us. You can make a difference


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Support the nonprofit Oxford American by donating today! Your generosity helps ensure that we continue to publish unexpected stories and unique perspectives of the South from the region’s leading and emerging voices. Independent media like the OA is more important today than ever. 

Join the Oxford American as we explore the South’s complexity and vitality through excellent writing, music, and visual art.

YOUR CONTRIBUTIONS HELP US TO:

  • Empower the creative people shaping our culture today
  • Contribute to the artistic legacy of the South
  • Publish outstanding nonfiction, fiction, and poetry
  • Create the annual music issue and accompanying CD
  • Present live multi-discipline cultural and educational events, like concerts, panels, and masterclasses

The Oxford American is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, making your contribution tax-deductible. 

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Donate $100 or more and you will automatically become a member of the Oxford American Society!


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