A Points South essay from the Summer 2019 issue I have wanted to visit this house for years. Like many North Carolina kids, I grew up with the broad strokes of Thomas Wolfe’s story, the prolific, small-town genius who became… by Stephanie Powell Watts | Jun, 2019

Thomas Jefferson, Pharrell, and more notes on the state of Virginia  Now, when strangers ask me where I’m from, I say, “Virginia Beach. We gave the world Pharrell. You’re welcome.” Pharrell was the black cosmopolitan force that proved my home… by Mychal Denzel Smith | Jun, 2019

Zora Neale Hurston’s lessons in writing a love story At one point, sitting in the Beinecke Library, I closed my eyes and let my fingers fall on random sentences of Hurston’s masterwork. Word for word, sentence for sentence, Their Eyes… by Regina Porter | Jun, 2019

A poem from the Summer 2019 issue. Here it is iftar and I forgot to eat I’m banqueting on a spice that’s not on this table by Mohja Kahf | Jun, 2019

We would like to hear from you.  The magazine will begin publishing letters to the editor in the fall issue and going forward. If you would like to respond to a story published in the magazine, we welcome your letter. by Oxford American | Jun, 2019

 A Letter from the Editor, Summer 2019. At the Oxford American, we receive many pitches for stories in the category of “pilgrimages,” or “literary road trips,” or “retracing X’s steps.” I understand the appeal: the traveler can see with her… by Eliza Borné | Jun, 2019

A Points South essay from the Summer 2019 issue As an evangelist, I have showed “Miracles” to many people by lying about what it’s actually about. Generally, I describe it as a sort of joke, a curiosity. I don’t tell… by Jacob Rosenberg | Jun, 2019

An installment in John T. Edge’s Points South column, Local Fare. Costumes transform their bar into a theatrical production, Feizal said to me that day in the jungle room. “You watch someone put on a Big Bird suit and then… by John T. Edge | Jun, 2019

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Texas Love Letter LP

Texas Love Letter LP (0)

Introducing the Oxford American's first ever vinyl LP, a Texas Love Letter compilation to compliment our Texas Music Issue & CD. Conceived and composed by the staff of the Oxford American with help from our friend, Texas songwriting legend Ray Wylie Hubbard, the LP is available as a limited-edition gift for a donor premium of $240 (to be delivered in January 2015).

Your donation to the Oxford American Literary Project, a 501c(3) non-profit organization, is tax-deductible. All proceeds from this special project will go toward producing more of the Oxford American magazine's great writing and music you love.

This special donor gift is not for sale and is limited to 400 hand-numbered copies.

TEXAS LOVE LETTER LP

Side A

1. “House of Blue Lights" by Ella Mae Morse
2. "Dirty Work At The Crossroads" by Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown
3. “Grand Candy Young Sweet” by Fever Tree
4. “Me And My Destiny” by Doug Sahm
5. “Corazon Viajero” by Tish Hinojosa
6. “Harm's Swift Way” (Demo) by Townes Van Zandt

Side B

1. “Amarillo Highway” by Terry Allen
2. “Let Her Dance” by Bobby Fuller Four
3. “The Messenger” by Ray Wylie Hubbard
4. “Satin Sheets” by Willis Alan Ramsey
5. “Gospel” by Charlie Sexton


In eleven masterful songs, the Oxford American’s Texas Love Letter LP showcases the high-caliber songcraft of the state of Texas—some of which has never been available in any form. Most notably, we are proud to debut Townes Van Zandt’s final recording, “Harm's Swift Way.” The song has been covered by Robert Plant and a few others over the years, but the original demo version has never been officially released until now. Thanks to the generosity of Van Zandt’s family and because of Townes’s appreciation of the Oxford American magazine in the last years of his life, we are honored to debut this hauntingly beautiful masterpiece.

Other highlights: A song from Willis Alan Ramsey’s long out-of-print self-titled 1972 album, a Texas cult classic; a new stripped-down arrangement of “Gospel,” recorded live by Charlie Sexton in October 2014, exclusively for this album; and, on the back sleeve of the LP, a love letter to Texas songwriting penned by our friend Ray Wylie Hubbard.

Besides delivering a quarterly magazine of stellar writing, photography, and art with a unique Southern perspective, the Oxford American is dedicated to promoting literacy and exploring Southern culture through various other creative endeavors. We exist by way of the generous support of our readers, donors, advertisers and partners and we have more projects in store like this one, but we need your support.

Donate today to reserve your copy and receive the Oxford American’s first vinyl LP release.

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TUESDAY, NOV. 27, 2018

Help us make #GivingTuesday a success! Donate to our new Women Artists Fund to make a difference. 

Without you, there’s no us. You can make a difference


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Support the nonprofit Oxford American by donating today! Your generosity helps ensure that we continue to publish unexpected stories and unique perspectives of the South from the region’s leading and emerging voices. Independent media like the OA is more important today than ever. 

Join the Oxford American as we explore the South’s complexity and vitality through excellent writing, music, and visual art.

YOUR CONTRIBUTIONS HELP US TO:

  • Empower the creative people shaping our culture today
  • Contribute to the artistic legacy of the South
  • Publish outstanding nonfiction, fiction, and poetry
  • Create the annual music issue and accompanying CD
  • Present live multi-discipline cultural and educational events, like concerts, panels, and masterclasses

The Oxford American is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, making your contribution tax-deductible. 

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Donate $100 or more and you will automatically become a member of the Oxford American Society!


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