August 15, 2019

TUESESDAY, MAR. 31, 2020 at 6:30 PM | LITTLE ROCK

A special reading and discussion at Ron Robinson Theater featuring Leesa Cross-Smith, author of So We Can Glow: Stories. Moderating the discussion is OA contributor and author of A Few Seconds of Radiant FilmstripKevin Brockmeier.

“Leesa Cross-Smith is a consummate storyteller who uses her formidable talents to tell the oft-overlooked stories of people living in that great swath of place between the left and right coasts.” —Roxane Gay, author of Bad Feminist




August 15, 2019

TUESESDAY, FEB. 25, 2020 at 6:30 PM | LITTLE ROCK

A special reading and discussion at Ron Robinson Theater featuring Silas House, author of Southernmost. Moderating the discussion is OA contributor and editor-in-chief at Sibling Rivalry Press, Seth Pennington.

“An urgent and beautifully written literary thriller about a man on the run that explores themes like the pain of atonement and the necessity of reconciliation, being published at a time when understanding across cultural and political divides seems wider than ever." —Salon.com




August 15, 2019

TUESESDAY, NOV. 19, 2019 at 6:30 PM | LITTLE ROCK

A special reading and discussion at Ron Robinson Theater featuring Van Jensen and Nate Powell, author and illustrator of Two Dead. Moderating the discussion is OA senior editor and author of Carry the Rock, Jay Jennings.

“I’m always eager to bring my home state to life through comics, and each book doubles as a love letter to Arkansas in all its contradictory beauty.” —Nate Powell




August 15, 2019

TUESESDAY, OCT. 15, 2019 at 6:30 PM | LITTLE ROCK

A special reading and discussion at Ron Robinson Theater featuring Sarah M. Broom, author of The Yellow House. Moderated by KaToya Ellis Fleming, our 2019-2020 OA Jeff Baskin Fellow.

“Gorgeously written, intimate and wise, Sarah M. Broom’s The Yellow House is an astonishing memoir of family, love, and survival. It’s also a history of New Orleans unlike any we’ve seen before, one that should be required reading.” —Jami Attenberg, author of All Grown Up




July 11, 2019

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 18, 2019 at 7:30 PM | LITTLE ROCK

“Witnessing Parker Millsap sing for the first time is a jarring experience, because the sights and sounds just don’t seem to match up: the slightly built [Oklahoman] has a bluesy, powerful rasp of a howl that sounds equally suited for juke joints or church tents.”
Rolling Stone

June 11, 2019

A commemoration of the No Tears Suite from the Summer 2019 issue

I hadn’t been to Little Rock until the performance, and to be able to go to the museum across the street, to be reminded with videos how horrific that moment was, to actually play in that school, that was deep. To know that this is something that’s so heavy, something we’re still going through, even. To be there in the same town, on the same block, in the exact same building and onstage, in that beautiful auditorium. It was an emotional time.

April 17, 2019

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 2, 2019 at 7:00 PM | LITTLE ROCK

** SOLD OUT **

“The chance to see [Son Volt] perform in smaller, more intimate venues isn’t one you should pass up.”
No Depression

November 15, 2018

An installment in our weekly series, The By and By. 

Twice during my visit, I listened to friends say over meals how much they genuinely loved the city. Both times, I immediately thought, Why? Living in New York as an aspiring writer had been hard—isolating and vicious. There had been casualties—relationships I’d leaned on until they broke or some that I’d neglected or cast aside. There had been fresh ideas or lines of inquiry that I’d shunned, in order to cling to diminishing prospects I’d hoped to turn into some type of currency—money, acclaim, respect. Where the city had once seemed a place of limitless potential, I’d become a kind of hermit—buffering myself against perspectives, change, the passage of time—unable to keep up.

September 27, 2018

An installment in our weekly series, The By and By. 

I’ve long struggled with my feelings toward the South End, having never loved the place the way I thought I should. Both my parents rhapsodize about the segregated black communities of their origins. But whereas their tales communicated the wills of their neighbors to persevere, my community seemed intent on trumpeting its hardship.

September 11, 2018

In A Southern Myth, Yarbrough’s photos grapple with the persistent tropes, misconceptions, and pressures of belonging in the South, and assume a photographic language where “‘myth’ is used as a poetic device to narrate a struggle for both the artist and the region to maintain a sense of identity.”

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