Notes on the songs from our 18th Southern Music Issue CD: Visions of the Blues. As we conceived of this issue, we sought a model for our task. (Metaphor, after all, is a hallmark of great blues.) The natural impulse… by Oxford American | Mar, 2017

I notice a few other attendees like me—people not in the PSA, interlopers, curious neophytes who have never grown from seed, who have no business even dreaming about discovering new cultivars. On Saturday, one woman interrupts a discussion about propagation… by Gwendolyn Knapp | Sep, 2016

Yesterday, the Washington Post’s Book World editor, Ron Charles, applauded the Oxford American’s Spring 2017 issue (which hits newsstands today) and joined us in celebrating the magazine’s twenty-fifth anniversary. “Here’s to the next 25 years of great writing and striking photography from a tough… by Oxford American | Mar, 2017

Short fiction by Glenn Taylor from our Spring 2017 issue.  I knew something was amiss when I began to see men and women on the street as trees. Their arms were branches and their fingers twigs. Some were sprouting little… by Glenn Taylor | Mar, 2017

A poem from our 18th Southern Music Issue: Visions of the Blues. I’m talking about the man at 80—trickling Jheri curl ol skool now razored down or just plain fell out to make way for sparse  and stubbled silver, his… by Patricia Smith | Mar, 2017

A poem from the 18th Southern Music Issue: Visions of the Blues. Some folk think the blues Is a song or a way Of singing But the blues is History by Nikki Giovanni | Mar, 2017

Rebecca Gayle Howell

Rebecca Gayle Howell is the author of American Purgatory, which was selected by Don Share for the Sexton Prize and will be released in the U.K. and the U.S. in early 2017. She is also the author of Render / An Apocalypse and the translator of Amal al-Jubouri's Hagar Before the Occupation / Hagar After the Occupation, both of which received wide critical acclaim. Howell is a senior editor at Oxford American. 

January 11, 2017

Atget, Modotti, Weston, Stieglitz, Avedon, Karsh, Brassaï, Bresson, Ulmann. Jim would hand the books to me with no explanation, no bias of who was who and why and what the world already thought of the work. He told me only to put paper clips on the pages holding photographs that “found something in me.”

July 01, 2016

Besides the fact that white doves are rare in East Kentucky (unless they are being released from wire cages at your mine-site nuptials), this dove sent a cold chill across Cowan because he’d arrived none other than on the day after Ralph Stanley passed.

February 26, 2016

Since joining the Oxford American in 2014, I’ve taken the occasion of our annual music issue to offer our readers a variety of special poetry features. I feel that our Georgia issue, aligned with the spirit of that state, acts as a little archive of a certain time and place, a bound capsule of song and sensibility.

June 08, 2014

Five poems from the spring 2014 issue.

Across the white highway, dogs drift unmoored
Silver-tipped seagrass, but no cactus. An offing
of shopping plazas, their harsh light and low roofs.
That's the way with drought; first dissent,
a worm belief that one place could be another.
I bet it feels good to twist a head of cotton
clean from the stem's fat and browning boll.
I bet it feels good to stand in irrigated rows.