We both loved Gary Stewart, and we both loved Grace. My wife Grace’s father was a big man. He wasn’t much more than six feet tall, but I think folks thought of him as taller because he carried himself large.… by David Ramsey | Sep, 2017

A story by Jesmyn Ward, the third and final excerpt from her forthcoming novel  Sing, Unburied, Sing. The officer is young, young as me, young as Michael. He’s skinny and his hat seems too big for him, and when he… by Jesmyn Ward | Sep, 2017

Sketches of Tennessee. From the time I was about ten years old, my mother and I put in our time by visiting with Irma for an hour or two every day. We’d bring her the Enquirer and Star and try to cheer her up… by Danielle Chapman | Sep, 2017

It was around this time that my father and his friends started a gang. They were all blanquitos from Condado: Yasser Benítez, Claudio LaRocca, Tommy Del Valle, and Juanma Thon. On the night their gang became official, they downed a… by Kevin A. González | Sep, 2017

Traces of Cormac McCarthy’s Knoxville.  McCarthy’s books came to me as transformative things so often do: several-times borrowed. It was during my junior year of college, my first semester back home in Colorado after a failed track scholarship out of state.… by Noah Gallagher Shannon | Sep, 2017

An installment in Chris Offutt’s Omnivore column, Cooking with Chris.  Nothing is as powerful as the extraordinary jolt of a teenager’s first love. It’s like seeing the world after a double-cataract surgery. Life is suddenly exquisite. Each leaf becomes the bearer… by Chris Offutt | Sep, 2017

A poem from the Fall 2017 issue. Always walked this close between the rows.Always smoked so many seeds.You will find yourself dragging              a live rabbit by one foot, the other kicking. by Jenny Browne | Sep, 2017

A kind of connective tissue linked my country’s most African city with an African moment that seemed stunningly American. The pallbearers danced, the band played, the mourners walked and swayed alongside while men and women pressed yet more naira bills… by Osayi Endolyn | Sep, 2017

A poem from the Fall 2017 issue. As a boy I pleaded with the river to teach me its long and winding vowels. In exchange I taught it swear words, how to play games. by Jacob Shores-Argüello | Sep, 2017

 A Letter from the Editor, Fall 2017. It is an ongoing project: reckoning with our past, making the South a better place to live and dream and learn and work. by Eliza Borné | Sep, 2017

Hunting season swept through my hometown with the crisp northern winds that sent leaves and trash dancing down King Street, near the Old Spanish Trail. In late fall, the town’s annual hunters’ gathering—Buck Fever—packed the county fairgrounds with guns and… by Gabriel Daniel Solis | Sep, 2017

Editor's Note: We are saddened to learn of the death of rock & roll legend Tom Petty on Monday, October 2, 2017. He was sixty-six. Revisit Holly George-Warren’s interview with Petty from our Fourth Annual Southern Music issue in 2000. Since… by Holly George-Warren | Jul, 2000

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Texas Love Letter LP

Texas Love Letter LP (0)

Introducing the Oxford American's first ever vinyl LP, a Texas Love Letter compilation to compliment our Texas Music Issue & CD. Conceived and composed by the staff of the Oxford American with help from our friend, Texas songwriting legend Ray Wylie Hubbard, the LP is available as a limited-edition gift for a donor premium of $240 (to be delivered in January 2015).

Your donation to the Oxford American Literary Project, a 501c(3) non-profit organization, is tax-deductible. All proceeds from this special project will go toward producing more of the Oxford American magazine's great writing and music you love.

This special donor gift is not for sale and is limited to 400 hand-numbered copies.

TEXAS LOVE LETTER LP

Side A

1. “House of Blue Lights" by Ella Mae Morse
2. "Dirty Work At The Crossroads" by Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown
3. “Grand Candy Young Sweet” by Fever Tree
4. “Me And My Destiny” by Doug Sahm
5. “Corazon Viajero” by Tish Hinojosa
6. “Harm's Swift Way” (Demo) by Townes Van Zandt

Side B

1. “Amarillo Highway” by Terry Allen
2. “Let Her Dance” by Bobby Fuller Four
3. “The Messenger” by Ray Wylie Hubbard
4. “Satin Sheets” by Willis Alan Ramsey
5. “Gospel” by Charlie Sexton


In eleven masterful songs, the Oxford American’s Texas Love Letter LP showcases the high-caliber songcraft of the state of Texas—some of which has never been available in any form. Most notably, we are proud to debut Townes Van Zandt’s final recording, “Harm's Swift Way.” The song has been covered by Robert Plant and a few others over the years, but the original demo version has never been officially released until now. Thanks to the generosity of Van Zandt’s family and because of Townes’s appreciation of the Oxford American magazine in the last years of his life, we are honored to debut this hauntingly beautiful masterpiece.

Other highlights: A song from Willis Alan Ramsey’s long out-of-print self-titled 1972 album, a Texas cult classic; a new stripped-down arrangement of “Gospel,” recorded live by Charlie Sexton in October 2014, exclusively for this album; and, on the back sleeve of the LP, a love letter to Texas songwriting penned by our friend Ray Wylie Hubbard.

Besides delivering a quarterly magazine of stellar writing, photography, and art with a unique Southern perspective, the Oxford American is dedicated to promoting literacy and exploring Southern culture through various other creative endeavors. We exist by way of the generous support of our readers, donors, advertisers and partners and we have more projects in store like this one, but we need your support.

Donate today to reserve your copy and receive the Oxford American’s first vinyl LP release.

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Support the nonprofit Oxford American by donating today! Your generosity helps ensure that we continue to publish unexpected stories and unique perspectives of the South from the region’s leading and emerging voices. Independent media like the OA is more important today than ever. 

Join the Oxford American as we explore the South’s complexity and vitality through excellent writing, music, and visual art.

YOUR CONTRIBUTIONS HELP US TO:

  • Empower the creative people shaping our culture today
  • Contribute to the artistic legacy of the South
  • Publish outstanding nonfiction, fiction, and poetry
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The Oxford American is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, making your contribution tax-deductible. 

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