Award Banner

Reggie Michael Rodrigue

 

Born on Bayou Lafourche in the small town of Cut Off, Louisiana, Reggie Michael Rodrigue is an artist, arts writer, and curator. Rodrigue connects Louisiana's Bayou Country and Southern culture to the global visual arts scene as an online art columnist for THE OA and as a staff writer for the South Louisiana visual arts journal PELICAN BOMB, along with his own visual arts blog Louisianaesthetic.

 

Articles by Reggie Michael Rodrigue

THE ONLY STAIR THAT DOESN'T CREAK: John Otte Thumbnail

THE ONLY STAIR THAT DOESN'T CREAK: John Otte

We disembark from our car onto the deserted intersection of Desire and Royal. The streetlights tint everything around us with an obscene glow and the night air barely stirs. It seems like we are in some sort of residential zone as there are houses around us with dim, amber lamps illuminating silent, furnished interiors; however, the overarching feeling of the place at this moment is more in line with some derelict territory lodged somewhere between a dream and a nightmare.
Department: Reggie Rodrigue
THE ONLY STAIR THAT DOESN'T CREAK: Silence Thumbnail

THE ONLY STAIR THAT DOESN'T CREAK: Silence

Four minutes and thirty-three seconds of supposed silence in 1952 forever changed the course of Western music and art—supposed because the silence that the audience thought they were hearing was actually full of sound. During the first movement, one could hear the wind stirring outside. There was a patter of raindrops hitting the concert hall’s roof while the second movement was underway. During the third movement, according to Cage, the people in the audience made “all kinds of interesting sounds as they talked and walked about.”
Department: Reggie Rodrigue
THE ONLY STAIR THAT DOESN'T CREAK: Brent Stewart Thumbnail

THE ONLY STAIR THAT DOESN'T CREAK: Brent Stewart

A stationary camera is set on a rooftop. The camera has been loaded with grainy, black and white sixteen mm film and begins recording. A dancer stands between the camera and a city skyline. Bunker-like warehouses, a cellphone or radio tower, a telephone pole, a river, and skyscrapers loom in the distance beyond the expansive, concrete rooftop-cum-dance floor.
Department: Reggie Rodrigue
THE ONLY STAIR THAT DOESN'T CREAK: Picturing the South Thumbnail

THE ONLY STAIR THAT DOESN'T CREAK: Picturing the South

Isle de Jean Charles is a narrow speck of land hanging off the coast of Terrebonne Parish as it gives way to the vast waters of the Gulf of Mexico. But for its small coterie of residents, mostly members of the Chitimacha and Houma Native-American tribes, it is more than that. It is the only home they and two centuries of their ancestors have ever known. It is their livelihood, and it may be their watery grave if nature has its way. You see, Isle de Jean Charles is quickly sinking into the Gulf of Mexico. Some residents and geologists say that it is sinking at a rate of one football field’s worth of land an hour.
Department: Reggie Rodrigue
THE ONLY STAIR THAT DOESN'T CREAK: Eugene Martin Thumbnail

THE ONLY STAIR THAT DOESN'T CREAK: Eugene Martin

In my fantasy, he’s on the platform, watching all these artists getting on trains heading to destinations like Minimalism, Conceptual Art, and Pop Art. As they depart, he waves goodbye to them and says, “I’ll see you in the future when everyone will be bored with the likes of you!” The future has arrived, and many young artists today are reinvestigating Modernism in earnest and taking it in directions that Martin has already covered.
Department: Reggie Rodrigue
Connect:
  • Find Us on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Flickr
  • YouTube
Somewhere in the South

Digital Editions

  • Zinio
  • Kindle
  • Nook

One year for only $19.98

Orders outside the US