Award Banner

The Part-Time Voyeur Picks: Movies 'N Music

 

RUSHMORE

Methinks Hollywood has anointed Henry “T Bone” Burnett as its go-to hunk for soundtracks. But when the musical bio of The Voyeur finally plays out before your dazzled eyes, it will be Wes Anderson who married our image to his music. With Rushmore, the boy wonder proved his uncanny ability in this area. The CD version of the Rushmore soundtrack was likewise a hit, even though it was inexplicably absent of the obscure but jaunty Rolling Stones 1966 track “I’m Waiting,” which played out at a pivotal point in the movie. (When it comes to song rights, The Stones are brazen ogres who take and don’t give.) Wes Anderson is magical in finding hidden but essential songs from bands we think we know (The Stones, The Kinks, The Who). Here is the missing soundtrack song in all its vigor:

 


 

UNIT FOUR PLUS TWO

Wes A. also introduces us to bands we never before knew, like Unit Four Plus Two (also from Rushmore). Here is a version of that delirious ditty as covered by Eddie Rambeau (who?):

 


 

THE FABULOUS BAKER BOYS

Those with taste and eyesight are still haunted by slinky Michelle Pfeiffer’s performance of the song “Making Whoopee” in the movie The Fabulous Baker Boys. Well, all righty—we are also haunted by the form-capturing red drapery and likewise colored stilettos and the way she sprawls atop that piano like she wants it to come alive. Hellfire, even her name still whispers to us (Suzie Diamond). That flick, by the way, holds up beyond the ’80s kitsch that punctuated it, because subtle acting always endures. In Fab Boys, it’s the acting between the Brothers Bridges that stands forth, thanks to their caressing of details and nuances usually bypassed by Hollywood. In this, they created what still might be their best performances. Here, though, I give you another song that didn’t make the CD version of the soundtrack, Miss Pfeiffer’s take on “Ten Cents a Dance” (Skip to the 23:30 mark!):


 

THE SCENE. 

For the benighted who missed it:

 


 

THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

This is what Grandfather Voyeur always says, until our ears almost bleed from repetition: “Sonnyboy, they don’t make ’em like they used to.” Oddly, that statement is sometimes truer than anything else I’ve ever heard. Case in point: the opening credits to a few Leone/Morricone/Eastwood jobbers. Signor Morricone layered simple sounds so precisely and strangely that a complex but captivating mass emerged. He’s positively Moondoggish in that regard. He also directs and captures an impeccable guitar sound, a sound that would’ve sounded square in most other hands. Also, Morricone is intrepid enough to go with what he hears—or mishears. The Hollywood cowboy music that he translated for Italians is slightly off from what you and I heard back in the states. Morricone’s take is only distantly related to Hollywood bombast; it captures the energy, but is more fantastical and personal and is forever caught somewhere between two different worlds….


 

EXTRAS: GERVAIS AND BOWIE

A failed series with some classic moments:

 

blog comments powered by Disqus
Connect:
  • Find Us on Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Flickr
  • YouTube

Digital Editions

  • Zinio
  • Kindle
  • Nook

One year for only $19.98

Orders outside the US